Crumlin
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Fact sheet
Description: 

The Crumlin meteorite fell on September 13th 1902. It landed 20 yards away from John Adams who was gathering apples from a tree on the edge of a cornfield at Crosshill Farm. It was a cloudy day so he didn't see it fall, but he heard the noise of it landing (he thought it was the boiler at a local mill bursting). After finding a hole in the ground he returned with a spade and dug up a dense black stone weighing 4.3 kg. Its outer surface was almost entirely covered with fusion crust.

Crumlin is in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

The Crumlin meteorite is classified as an L5 ordinary chondrite meaning it has a low iron content (5-10%) and indistinct chondrules (round features) that have in many places have been metamorphosed under conditions to homogenise the pre-existing minerals (olivine and pyroxene mainly).

See also:
http://www.meteorite-times.com/accretion-desk/an-october-1902-witnessed-...

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php?code=5477

Specimen: BM86115

In Place
In Time
Location description: 
Crumlin, Northern Ireland
Accuracy:
Location precision: 
Good
Timescale:
Timescale: 
Hadean
Ma = Millions of years ago
In Focus
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Type:
Type: 
meteorite
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